Black Snake, the legend of the black snake lacks super [critique]

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Between Black Dynamite and Kick-Ass, Black Snake mostly lacks style.

Released at the beginning of 2019 in cinemas, Black Snake, the legend of the black snake arrives on this Monday evening in the clear on television, on C8. Here is the review of First.

Project dreamed up for a very long time by its actor and co-director Thomas N’Gijol, Black Snake, the legend of the black snake takes place in the 70s and tells the adventures of Clotaire, an African superhero raised by a Chinese martial arts master but more focused on alcohol and women than on a keen sense of justice. He will still embrace his destiny as a vigilante against a terrible dictator with a golden hand, supported by French spooks. Between Black Dynamite -for the retro blaxploitation side- and Kick-Ass -for his vulgos comic book side- black-snake does not look like much on arrival, except for a short film shot between friends in high school fed with video extracts from the Nanarland site. Which isn’t a big deal, in and of itself.

What’s more is that we don’t often laugh at this clumsy collage of scenes (it also seems to miss tons of them as the footage is full of holes despite its short duration of 1h26) where N ‘Gijol in freewheel does everything and anything, but lazily enough (a prout here, a punchline on living together there), to make us laugh.

That doesn’t mean there’s nothing to salvage in black-snake, the valves being so variable geometry that you will find something that will end up making you smile. But that’s not all: the film also wants to be a ferocious parody of Françafrique (with Bernard Menez as President of the Pompidou, and Edward Baer as an occult adviser) and colonialism. In the same genre, The Botswanga Crocodile was much more successful. It may be missing a Fabrice Eboue to give muscles (a style, a framework, a direction) to this black-snake very skinny.

Thomas N’Gijol and Fabrice Éboué look back on the success of Case Départ

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