Martin Scorsese looks back on his adaptation work on Shutter Island

Shutter Island
Paramount
Shutter Island
Paramount
Shutter Island
Paramount
Shutter Island
Paramount
Shutter Island
Paramount
Shutter Island
Paramount
Shutter Island
Paramount
Shutter Island
Paramount
Shutter Island
Paramount
Shutter Island
Paramount
Shutter Island
Paramount
Shutter Island
Paramount
Shutter Island
Shutter Island
Shutter Island
Shutter Island
Shutter Island
Shutter Island
Shutter Island
Shutter Island
Shutter Island
Shutter Island
Shutter Island
Shutter Island

The thriller worn by Leonardo DiCaprio is to be found this evening on Chérie25.

Shutter Island is broadcast tonight, from 9:05 p.m., on Chérie 25. In early 2010, Martin Scorsese had agreed to decipher his work of adapting the novel by Dennis Lehanewhich serves as the basis for the film, in First. Without spoiling the plot, he delivered the major imprints to the book, but also his own inventions, essential to intelligently transpose the story to the screen. Selected pieces.

From Mystic River to Live by Night: Dennis Lehane comments on the adaptations of his novels

Lehane’s talent? Knowing how to play with the reader’s imagination

The filmmaker delivered for example a crisp anecdote: when launching the casting of one of the female characters, he was convinced that the young woman was described as skinny in the novel. After checking, Scorsese realized that his physique was never specified by Lehane, but that, by an association of ideas, his photo reminded one of the characters of the concentration camps. Hence certainly the idea of ​​thinness, anchored in his mind, but which is never really explained!

“His writing is cinematic, in that, like in a film, he cuts through space and time. But he does it in the text. His work is quite extraordinary, with a very interesting peculiarity: his words have an evocative power that goes beyond what is written on the page. (he then takes for example the photos of a character who disappears at the beginning of the plot, Rachel, played by Emily Mortimer. When I read the book again to check how Lehane described these photos, I realized that he said nothing! (Laughter.) I was sure he had. I can swear he etched a vision in my mind that seemed to detail the entire scene. In other words, I had deduced that the photo of Rachel must represent her emaciated. However, the text does not specify it in any way! The book is filled with such examples.”

With Shutter Island, Martin Scorsese concocts a dizzying sensory puzzle [critique]

The desire to work again with Leonardo DiCaprio

By all these small details, the adaptation of the novel was not easy. To make the actors understand his vision of the story, Martin Scorsese showed them dozens of films, including Laura, by Otto Preminger, and The Claw of the Past, by Jacques Tourneur. In particular to Leonardo DiCapriowho had to understand the anxieties of his character as a police inspector, in order to play them better… The director had placed all his hopes in him: “As soon as I read it, I knew that the leading role was for Leo. We had been looking for a common project for two years. Of course, I’m thirty years older than him, but I think we see the world in the same way. DiCaprio fits the characters I’ve pitched to Robert De Niro and Harvey Keitel over the years, and he’s not afraid to confront certain topics and he has an interesting way of exploring roles. I don’t say this lightly: we never really know in advance how far this work can lead. It’s always daunting at first. You have to be very careful when we start detailing the many facets of a character. This time, the story lent itself to it even more than for Howard Hughes in Aviator. When we finished Shutter Island, Leo was surprised at how far he had come psychologically and emotionally. After rehearsals, we thought we had two or three playback levels in each scene, but in fact there are more. t by turning them that it was revealed.”

Leonardo DiCaprio: “I want my films to be events”

“The less we show, the better.”

In the book, there were more flashbacks, and that was reworked primarily by screenwriter Leta Kalogris. “Flashbacks were much more present in the book. In trying to represent these flashbacks (or dreams), I discovered that the less shown the better. So I intentionally ignored some very In contrast, in the film, we immediately see the face of Teddy’s wife, Dolores (Michelle Williams). vivid and slightly disturbing. To evoke Dachau, we studied the films that George Stevens shot in 16 mm Kodachrome at the time of the liberation of the camps. We also wondered how to go from dream to consciousness and back again – finally, we used cuts during the editing. Do they have an effect on a psychological or emotional level? What information should be given to the viewer when the dream begins? What comes first: awareness of the thought or thought see herself? These questions pursued us throughout the editing of the film. We wanted the images to glide like music…”

Martin Scorsese describes his next film with DiCaprio and De Niro as a western

The importance of music

Moreover, if the soundtrack of Shutter Island is so special, it’s because the team has taken care to ensure that it participates in the oppressive atmosphere of the film: “The only music quoted in the book is a piece by Mahler. We used it. For the rest, with Robbie Robertson, who supervised the soundtrack, we listened to and collected about twenty hours of contemporary symphonic music composed by György Ligeti, Krysztof Penderecki, Max Richter, John Cage, Nam June Paik, John Adams, Brian Eno… We “superimposed” and sometimes combined two or three pieces. This musical accompaniment should reflect not the state of mind of Teddy, but his way of perceiving this world which is his and which does not stop changing. The music must also be versatile, as if it served at the same time as a sound effect. The first notes heard resemble the sound of “a foghorn. The track – Ingram Marshall’s Fog Tropes – has a ghostly tone, yet exerts a strange seduction. What draws Teddy to this world? The foghorn? The sea itself The cry of the seagulls Everything is music I don’t want to that’s too much to say for those who haven’t read the book or seen the movie, but when on the boat Teddy faces his mirror and rinses his face telling himself to control himself, the music reflects from the start the impression that he is on the verge of depression.”

Trailer of Shutter Island :

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