What are the influences that helped give birth to Boba Fett?

What are the influences that helped give birth to Boba Fett?
20th Century Fox / The Associated Artists / Lucasfilm / Columbia

We find in the Star Wars bounty hunter the breath of a multitude of references, those with which George Lucas grew up …

The broadcast of the series Star wars dedicated to Boba Fett launches today on Disney Plus. On this occasion, First devotes a file to the bounty hunter (with a collector’s mask) in n ° 525 (January 2021). Extract.

Boba Fett’s book will “take our breath away” promises Robert Rodriguez

BOBA FETT: HUNTER UNDER INFLUENCE

40% MAN WITHOUT NAME

George Lucas never hid it. And in the DVD bonuses of The Empire Strikes Back, the director confirms that it was Sergio Leone’s bounty hunter who inspired that of Star wars. The cowboy played by Clint Eastwood in For a handful of dollars (1964), and for a few more dollars (1965), and The good, the bad and the ugly (1966) speaks little, his gaze still hidden behind the visor of his hat. Like him, Boba is particularly enigmatic, he pulls right, has a quite relative moral sense and also sports, on the first models sketched by Ralph McQuarrie and Joe Johnston, a similar poncho, which will then be abandoned for practical reasons. To reinforce this western aspect which Lucas was fond of, the noise makers even had the idea of ​​adding spurs to this space cowboy in postproduction.

Clint Eastwood THE NAMELESS MAN
The Associated Artists

10% JOSH RANDALL

When we talk about a bounty hunter, we necessarily think of the one played by Steve McQueen in In the name of the law, the cult series of the sixties. He was armed with his iconic “Mare’s Leg”, a Winchester rifle with sawn butt and barrel. Boba has his iconic flamethrower!

Steve McQueen in In the Name of the Law
CBS

10% GUNSLINGER

In the Westworld Original by Michael Crichton (1973), Yul Brynner is a buggy android that suddenly begins to unsolder park visitors. Certainly, Boba is not a robot. But constantly camouflaged in his metal armor, he also has something of a trigger-happy humanoid …

Original Westworld by Michael Crichton (1973), Yul Brynner
MGM

20% MUSASHI

The work of Akira Kurosawa was a great inspiration to George Lucas. It is no coincidence that Obi-Wan Kenobi looks like a fake samurai in Star Wars. The Japanese influence is less evident in Boba Fett and yet there is clearly something of Toshiro Mifune in the mercenary of the saga. This same aura of a lethal, calm and determined warrior, reminiscent of the roles of Mifune and the representation of the samurai that he left in popular culture, through films like The Legend of Musashi (1954).

The Legend of Musashi
Tōhō

5% MAGNETO

Fett has no power, like the villainous Marvel born in the comics in 1963. But this helmet, inseparable from the character, echoes the one that the enemy of the X-Men wore at all times. “His helmet is his face”, said Joe Johnston (the artistic director of the first Star wars) about Boba.

Magneto
20th Century Fox

10% FLASH GORDON

At the beginning of the 70s, George Lucas really wanted to adapt the galactic hero of the comics – born from the pen of Alex Raymond in 1934 – to the cinema. Unable to acquire the rights, he decides to create Star wars instead … That says a lot about the impact this cosmic sniper has had on the franchise. It’s hard not to see a connection with Boba, a bounty hunter who plays the blaster with the same dexterity as Flash Gordon plays the laser gun!

Flash Gordon
Columbia

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